5 TIPS ON HOW TO ARRANGE FURNITURE

style & photo by NYCLQ

Just moved and don’t quite know where to begin placing furniture in your new space? Looking to revamp or restyle your existing space? Here are some tips to help you arrange your furniture in a new or existing space. Sometimes, a simple shift is all that is needed. Also, keep in mind your color selections to work with your furniture arranging. Painting a wall a dark accent color, similar to the oversized piece, can help make it disappear into the wall. This can help to make the space feel more open. After you've painted and cleared the space, here are a few suggestions you might consider when confronting your furniture placement and design dilemmas:

style & photo by NYCLQ
1. Plan & place large area rugs and furniture pieces first. Your frustration level will definitely increase if you try to start the process with small tables and accent pieces. Think of it this way: they’d always be in your way and would need to move it and move it back again. How exhausting would that be?

style & photo by NYCLQ
2. In rooms with cathedral, vaulted, or industrial ceilings, place your largest furniture pieces close to the highest wall. Furnishings such as oversized entertainment centers or oversized bookcases will work best on the tall wall to help anchor the space. It’s about balance, scale and proportion.


style & photos by NYCLQ

3. In loft, long, or open spaces, try angling your furniture. When your key furniture pieces – sofas, lounges, and chairs are all lined up flat against a wall, you lose the opportunity to create intimate conversational groupings. Take away the look of a room resembling an office waiting area, and add interest to your space.


style & photo by NYCLQ

4. When selecting furniture to be placed in a smaller room, try these thoughts on for size:



• To make larger objects feel less obtrusive, paint the wall the same color as the item. It will ‘appear’ to disappear, and thereby open up a space.
• One large oversized piece can work in a small space to make it feel large (as long as all other pieces are in proportion to the space.)
• Try to find case good pieces that are tall and shallow to give your small space more height
• Try tailored styled upholstered pieces with rounded corners.
• Include transparency: Lucite and glass tables can give needed surface space without taking up ‘visual’ space to your eye. These surfaces will also help bounce light around the room, making it feel larger.


style & photo by NYCLQ
5. If your largest wall consists of all or mostly windows, you can create a ‘soft wall’ by installing a ceiling track for panels. If space permits above window, you could also try installing a double-hung rod for layered sheers and panels. The rod, after well anchored to wall, can give the ability to hang artwork from.

BEFORE

Also to consider is how you will REALLY best utilize the space. When we purchased this town home, the dining space was naturally set adjacent to the kitchen and living area, but it felt forced and cramped when furniture was placed. But our layout has another space at the entrance of our town home.


AFTER (just ONE version)

BEFORE
WHY anyone would sponge an already stucco textured wall is behind my comprehension.

AFTER
SOLID modern neutral helped anchor the space.

So rather than cram the dining space next to the already existing kitchen counter, I purchased bar stools and converted the front area to the dining room, which helped give more space for a functional living room. To further unite the spaces, two same styled ceiling fans replaced the chandelier and builders white fan.


One last tip: To help SAVE YOUR BACK (and floors) invest in SLIDES to help move furniture with easy... Grey carpeted ones for wood floors, and the plastic for carpet or tiles furniture moving.

Happy Shifting!!




9 comments:

  1. Great points. WOW, I don't think I have ever seen a before of your place. Not only to you work miracles with the constant evolving, but my word, you ROCK!!

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  2. LOL... Nope... that before pic just made its' debut appearance on the web! Frightening, wasn't it? And first did try the 'expected' layout of the space - it SO did NOT work.

    We don't 'dine'. We're casual and we use the bar-counter religiously... even with guests. And the dining space gets used for holidays (or maybe now for some future presentations to build a business in my local community)

    Thanks for visiting & posting comment!
    :D Lynda

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  3. Your home looks wonderful, and your tips are excellent! Stan

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  4. Hey Stan! Thanks so much for the compliments - glad you liked them and thanks for visiting the FP blog!!

    :D Lynda

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  5. My favorite is the ruffley valance! Yuck! I think I figured out how to comment on your blog. I don't have any of the accounts listed and it won't let me just comment as me. Weird! Still figuring it out. Love your page!! :) Cindy

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  6. OMG!!!It's the anonymous stalker all the way from JAPAN!!! Sorry you had such troubles commenting here, but THANK YOU for not only sticking it out, but giving me feedback on my FB page!

    You're a doll!
    :D Lynda

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  7. Sponge paint, wow that is a flash back, I in fact remember sponge painting a bathroom of mine years ago....what a horrible paint technique that was. You did a great job transforming the room!

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  8. LOL... it 'was' the thing to do (in the 90's!!) but to give texture to flat walls... this horror was done on STUCCO TEXTURE!!!

    Ralph Lauren's paint covered it in one coat. Thank Goodness!!

    Thanks for stopping by!
    :D Lynda

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  9. Open living room to dining room design do seem to make the space appear bigger, don't they? Good post.

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